NASA's InSight lander 'hears' Martian wind

InSight is designed to study the interior of Mars like never before using seismology instruments to detect quakes and a self-hammering mole to measure heat escape from the planet's crust

InSight is designed to study the interior of Mars like never before using seismology instruments to detect quakes and a self-hammering mole to measure heat escape from the planet's crust

Two sensitive sensors, air pressure sensor inside the spacecraft and a seismometer, recorded the vibrations in different ways.

Specialist aerospace Agency Bruce Banerdt said that the Mars machine does not have the goal to hear something like that, but audio can really speak of a "certain sound waves on Mars".

NASA's InSight lander on the surface of Mars.

Bruce Banerdt, InSight principal investigator at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), said that capturing the sound waves on the red planet was unexpected and that its mission was dedicated to detecting the motion on Mars which also includes the motion caused by the sound waves.

When earthquakes occur on Earth, their vibrations, which bounce around inside our planet, make it "ring" similar to how a bell creates sound.

The winds blowing across the spacecraft is the first sounds recorded from Mars, NASA said.

"Even though the Viking seismometer picked up what I would call motions of the spacecraft, I think it would be a stretch to call those sounds", he said.

A version of the sounds was altered to be more perceptible to the human ears, according to Nasa.

NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander successfully touched down on Mars in late November having made the incredible journey through 485-million-kilometers of space. NASA recommends that you hear the recording with listening equipment, because it's an eerie mix of low pitch and wind.

"The solar panels on the lander's sides respond to pressure fluctuations of the wind".

Sort of. The probe's instruments detected vibrations of the Martian air over its solar panels in frequency that human ears can hear.

"Hearing the first sounds ever recorded on the surface of another planet is a privilege". The raw images the craft sends back to NASA are hosted on the InSight mission site where anyone can take a look at them all and see what the craft's instruments see while on Mars.

The lander is also sharing numerous photos on its Twitter account and sharing information about its progress on Mars.

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