Trump says he plans to scrap birthright citizenship

“We’re the only country in the world where a person comes in and has a baby and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States,” said President Trump. “It’s ridiculous. And it has to end.” Above Trump last week at the White House

“We’re the only country in the world where a person comes in and has a baby and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States,” said President Trump. “It’s ridiculous. And it has to end.” Above Trump last week at the White House

Trump, in an interview with Axios this week, promised to end, by executive order, birthright citizenship for "anchor babies" (children born in the United States to non-U.S. parents).

While Trump asserts that he can change the provision with such an order, that is far from certain: there is a set process for modifying the constitution, which does not include presidential decree.

Collins said an executive order rescinding birthright citizenship would be subject to a court challenge and she believes the courts would likely invalidate the order.

"I am not a lawyer, but it seems to me it would take a constitutional amendment to change that as opposed to an executive order", Mr. Grassley told a local news channel in Iowa. Such a step would be regarded as an affront to the US Constitution, which was amended 150 years ago to include the words: "All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States".

Activists seeking to limit immigration, including Michael Anton, who wrote an article on the subject for the Washington Post in July, argue that illegal immigrants are not under the jurisdiction of the United States and therefore their children born on US soil should not be USA citizens.

"With all of those benefits [of citizenship], it's ridiculous", he said.

"They're playing all of us", said David W. Leopold, an immigration attorney and counsel to the immigration advocacy group America's Voice. He also added that the executive order is already "in the process".

Trump, seeking to energise his supporters and help Republicans keep control of Congress, has stoked anxiety about a caravan of Central American migrants making its way to the US-Mexico border. Trump dispatched more than 5,000 active-duty military troops to the southern border on Monday as a slow-moving human caravan of around 3,500 Central American migrants, including nursing mothers and children, trekked towards the United States border at least 1,000 miles away.

Trump insists his immigration moves have nothing to do with politics, even as he rails against the caravans at campaign rallies.

A portion of the interview was released on October 30, 2018. Guess what? You don't.

Vice President Mike Pence said the administration was "looking at action that would reconsider birthright citizenship".

He was referring to comments unearthed from 1993 in which Reid said that "no sane country" would award citizenship to children of illegal immigrants born on its soil and promoted legislation to end the practice.

In 1898, however, in the case of a man born in San Francisco to Chinese immigrants who lived permanently in the United States, the court ruled that the government could not deny him citizenship. The children, as citizens, can then sponsor their families to become USA citizens as well once they turn 21.

It turns out that it isn't just President Trump who has expressed his negative views of birthright citizenship.

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