NewsAlert: Russia suspends space launches pending probe into rocket failure

Soyuz-FG rocket booster blasts off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome carrying the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft with Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague of the ISS Expedition 57/58 prime crew aboard to the International Space Station (IS

Soyuz-FG rocket booster blasts off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome carrying the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft with Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague of the ISS Expedition 57/58 prime crew aboard to the International Space Station (IS

He and Ovchinin were due to join Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, NASA Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Roscosmos Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev on the ISS.

Astronauts on board a Soyuz rocket heading to the International Space Station survived an emergency landing following a booster failure, a Russian space official said Thursday. During a news conference held yesterday, NASA personnel praised Hague's record as an astronaut but said it was too early to tell when he might get a new launch.

Search and rescue crews have deployed to the Soyuz landing site and are in contact with the two crew members, one America and one Russian, who are in good condition.

Edition T-online notes that "after the failed launch of the spacecraft the current ISS crew is threatening a forced extension of the mission".

Moscow has suspended all manned space launches until it finds out what went wrong and Rogozin has ordered a state commission to investigate.

It was an unprecedented mishap for the Russian space programme and a criminal investigation is now under way to determine whether safety regulations had been violated during construction.

Russia's rockets are now the only way to get astronauts to the space station, but all manned flights have been out on hold in the wake of Thursday's accident.

Space X and Boeing are both working on ships that could transport astronauts to the station without relying on the Russian space program. Russian Federation says there is enough food on board to last until April.

A Russian rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed on launch Thursday, forcing the astronaut and cosmonaut to careen back to Earth in a dramatic emergency landing.

Three people are now aboard the space station: a German, a Russian and an American.

Rogozin on Friday posted a picture on Twitter of himself sat next to the two astronauts and said they had now arrived in Moscow.

Nick Hague and Aleksey Ovchinin before the aborted Soyuz launch on Thursday, Oct. 11.

Yesterday's problem occurred when the first and second stages of a booster rocket, launched from the Soviet-era cosmodrome of Baikonur in the central Asian country, were separating, triggering emergency systems soon after launch. It was Hague's first rocket launch.

"I think the investigation is going to go swiftly", Bridenstine said, but gave no further details on the preliminary findings.

Instead NASA astronaut Nick Hague and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin returned to Earth in a ballistic return of their capsule from an altitude of over 30 miles.

"I fully anticipate that we will fly again on a Soyuz rocket", he said, praising the "wonderful relationship" between Nasa and the Russian space agency Roscosmos.

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