New Climate Change Report Sounds Global Alarm ー Is Anyone Listening?

Climate change: Unprecedented action is required to curb temperature rise, says UN panel report

Climate change: Unprecedented action is required to curb temperature rise, says UN panel report

Two decades. That's all the time world leaders have to reverse emissions of greenhouse gases to avoid inundating coastal cities, killing off coral reefs and their attendant marine wildlife, and potential food shortages, according to a new United Nations report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

While warming of 2C above pre-industrial levels has widely been thought of as the threshold beyond which unsafe climate change will occur, vulnerable countries such as low-lying island states warn rises above 1.5C will threaten their survival.

Action in cities - which consume more than two-thirds of energy globally and account for about three-quarters of carbon emissions - are pivotal to meeting the target, said report author William Solecki, a professor at Hunter College-City University of NY.

And she said: "Today's report by the IPCC makes clear that avoiding risky climate change will require a transformational effort, and that is precisely what Labour is offering - a plan to rapidly decarbonise our energy system as part of a green jobs revolution, and a long term target of net zero emissions before 2050".

The findings released Monday by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change add pressure on policymakers and businesses to step up their response to global warming, which the scientists said is melting ice caps and making storms more violent.

The Indian government said the country is already facing the impacts of climate change.

Camera IconFederal Environment Minister Melissa Price.

Harald Winkler‚ director of the Research Energy Centre at UCT‚ said limiting warming to 1.5ºC would require "changes on an unprecedented scale and pace".

There's only twelve years left to avert climate change disaster, and Scott Morrison's still throwing around words like "nonsense". By 2050, emissions will need to be reduced by 100 percent.

The past 18 years have been the warmest on record since the 1850s when measurements began, he said. "The further we go the more explosions we are likely to set off: 1.5C is safer than 2C, 2C is safer than 2.5C, 2.5C is safer than 3C, and so on", he said.

A rise in global temperatures by another 0.5 degree Celsius would increase, deepen and spread the impacts wider, the scientists concluded.

The report lists various scenarios that might occur if the world hit 2 degrees of warming.

"The report shows that we only have the slimmest of opportunities remaining to avoid unthinkable damage to the climate system that supports life as we know it", Amjad Abdulla, an IPCC board member and chief negotiator for the alliance of small island states, told Reuters news agency. "Coral reefs would decline by 70-90 percent with global warming of 1.5°C, whereas virtually all ( 99 percent) would be lost with 2°C". The limited temperature increase would result in the saving of at least some of the world's coral reefs, a key ecosystem supporting global fisheries.

Researchers found that "human caused" C02 emissions need to be cut by almost half of 2010 levels by the 2030 to starve off the worts effects of climate change. On current trends the 1.5°C threshold could be reached as early as 2030.

The IPCC, in its report on global warming, said limiting it to 1.5 degrees Celsius will require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society. While an increase of that magnitude would boost sea levels by as much as 77 centimeters by the end of the century, that would be about 10 centimeters lower than at 2 degrees, the report said.

This report shows the longer we leave it to act, the more hard, the more expensive and the more unsafe it will be.

Phasing out the burning of coal, the most carbon-intensive form for power generation, nearly entirely by the middle of the century.

"Every extra bit of warming matters, especially since warming of 1.5 °C or higher increases the risk associated with long-lasting or irreversible changes, such as the loss of some ecosystems", said Hans-Otto Pörtner, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II.

The report's main concern is with rising carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere.

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