Jamal Khashoggi Fiancée Speaks out over Fears for Saudi Writer's Safety

People wait by the entrance to a blocked road leading to the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul on Thursday. Saudi Arabia's Consulate in Istanbul insisted Thursday that Jamal Khashoggi a missing Saudi contributor to The Washington Post left its bui

People wait by the entrance to a blocked road leading to the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul on Thursday. Saudi Arabia's Consulate in Istanbul insisted Thursday that Jamal Khashoggi a missing Saudi contributor to The Washington Post left its bui

"Efforts are being made to clarify allegations about Khashoggi".

Jamal Khashoggi, who writes opinion pieces for the Washington Post, has not been seen since entering the Saudi consulate building in Istanbul on Tuesday 2 October, where he was to receive an official document for the couple's marriage.

"We are ready to welcome the Turkish government to go and search our premises", bin Salman told Bloomberg. No one at the Saudi embassy in Ankara was available to comment on Thursday and an official at the consulate, asked about the envoy's summons, referred back to the statement.

She said he left his phone with her, with instructions to call Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan if he did not return.

On Tuesday, Khashoggi entered the consulate to get paperwork he needed in order to be married next week, said his fiancée Hatice, who gave only her first name for fear of retribution.

Prince Mohammed also said he hoped to resume oil production from the Neutral Zone, which Saudi Arabia shares with Kuwait, after resolving pending issues between the two Gulf OPEC allies.

"However, neither provided a satisfactory or clear statement", he said. "We don't know whether he is alive or dead".

Explaining that, after Trump became United States president, Saudi Arabia has already agreed to procure almost 60 percent of its arms from Washington, he emphasized that Riyadh owes nothing extra because it always pays for weapons supplies in cash.

Saudi Arabia has recently stepped up politically-motivated arrests, prosecution and conviction of peaceful dissident writers and human rights campaigners. He had trust in the consulate of his homeland.

'Ever since the relationship started between Saudi Arabia and the United States of America, we've bought everything with money, ' the 32-year-old prince told Bloomberg in an interview, saying he loves to work with the U.S. leader. "He was not against [the prince] but had suggestions for improvements to foreign policy in his country", the statement said.

Yemeni activist and 2011 victor of the Nobel Peace Prize Tawakkol Karman slammed Saudi authorities at the gathering. "As a missing person, he is in danger", she told the frenzy of reporters gathered at the consulate.

A day before entering the consulate, he told a friend that he was anxious about being kidnapped and sent back to Saudi Arabia, according to The New York Times.

The Post ran a blank column in its Friday edition, tweeting: "We are holding a spot for Jamal Khashoggi in Friday's newspaper".

The Washington Post's editorial board has urgedthe prince to "do everything in his power to ensure that Mr Khashoggi is free and able to continue his work".

"If Saudi authorities surreptitiously detained Khashoggi it would be yet another escalation of Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman's reign of repression against peaceful dissidents and critics", Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director at HRW, said. "To do otherwise would betray those who languish in prison".

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