We're livestreaming the Perseid meteor shower

AWESOME METEOR SHOWER COMING TO A SKY NEAR YOU THIS WEEKEND

AWESOME METEOR SHOWER COMING TO A SKY NEAR YOU THIS WEEKEND

As he was executed on August 10, many Catholics associate the Perseid meteor shower with St Lawrence, and dub the shooting stars as the "tears of St Lawrence" as they occur at the same time each year.

This year's show is predicted to be an "average" show by Perseid standards, with as many as 50-60 meteors per hour at peak.

There's no need to worry about meteors raining down on you, though, as Sky and Telescope says the bright streaks of the Perseids burning up are actually about 80 miles (128,748 meters) above your head and created by pieces of space debris about the size of a small pebble. That was most likely the Perseids.

Ethan Miller/Getty ImageThe Perseid meteor shower peaks in mid-August. Swift-Tuttle orbits the sun once every 133 years, but Earth still passes through the debris field it has left behind - its last visit to the inner solar system we all call home was in 1992. The Perseids happen every year, but this year's crescent moon will make the sky darker, allowing the meteors to shine. The meteor shower is expected to peak this weekend, on Saturday and Sunday (Aug. 11 and 12).

It is best to head out of town to enjoy the dark skies with the handsome Milky Way stretching from the south and continuing overhead. But "Earthgrazer" meteors, which skim Earth's atmosphere and showcase long, blazing tails, are visible earlier when the radiant is low above the horizon.

That is the million-dollar question of course.

By Monday morning, that boundary should have cleared and it looks like viewing conditions will be good for just about all of New England. It's recommended you find a dark sky in a rural area away from artificial lighting.

-Give your eyes about 30 minutes to adjust to the dark sky."Don't expect to walk outside and see Perseids", Cooke said.

This year's shower will be putting on its best display for those in Europe, but as it's peak last so long, from the 11th to 12th, it should also put on a spectacular display for the U.S. and elsewhere in the northern hemisphere.

Capturing the fleeting light show requires some luck as meteors quickly strike through the starry skies.

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