Ex-Cambridge Analytica CEO admits getting Facebook data from researcher

Alexander Nix former CEO of Cambridge Analytica arrives at an annex of the Houses of Parliament to appear before the Digital Culture Media and Sport Committee in London

Alexander Nix former CEO of Cambridge Analytica arrives at an annex of the Houses of Parliament to appear before the Digital Culture Media and Sport Committee in London

Facebook, in its response, had said that the data of over 5.6 lakh users in India may have been accessed without their consent.

A director at Cambridge Analytica, the data firm that has been roiled in controversy since reports suggested that more than 50 million people on Facebook had their data used by the firm without their knowledge, reportedly visited WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and talked about the 2016 presidential election. The data was leaked by researcher Alksandr Kogan; after his admission that he did pass on the data to Cambridge Analytica, Nix retracted his version of events to admit his company did receive Facebook-generated data.

The former boss of Cambridge Analytica was embroiled in the scandal during a Channel 4 documentary in the United Kingdom, in which he was seen boasting about the company's instrumentality in election President Trump. "I can't speak to her motives, I can't speak to what she was doing, she certainly wasn't there representing Cambridge Analytica or SCL".

The remarks came as an unrepentant Nix clashed with British lawmakers investigating the use of Facebook data in election campaigns.

"Of course, the answer to this question should have been 'yes, '" Nix was quoted as saying by Reuters, when asked if Cambridge Analytica still held data from the researcher.

However, though there are concerns around the handling of their data, just nine per cent of respondents said the Cambridge Analytica scandal led to them deleting content from their social media sites - but still not going as far as deleting their accounts.

Nix also called out Channel 4 for editing the footage to portray him in a worse light.

He replied: "I don't know that I was unlucky I think other business meetings are not steered by an undercover reporter who is deliberately trying to entrap you and therefore the conversation never moves into those areas and towards those subject matters". "All Mr Nix's comments carried in our reports were used in context, including any caveats", the broadcaster said in a statement.

Nix claims the data has since been deleted; he also claims that the company's whistleblower Christopher Wylie is lying about Cambridge Analytica's role in the European Union referendum campaign.

When asked why he thought the company was being unfairly "victimised", Nix said: "I think our involvement in the election of a president who's been so polarising for many voters put a huge target on our back".

And he dismissed as a "point-blank lie" the claims of whistle-blowing former CA employee Christopher Wyle that the company had played a pivotal role in delivering Brexit. "I am quite comfortable standing by the statements that I made".

Nix denied a story in the Financial Times that he had withdrawn $8 million from Cambridge Analytica before its collapse last month.

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